Vienna: Austrian Postal Savings Bank

Postsparkasse, 1904-1912. Architekt: Otto Wagner
Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

1904 – 1906, 1910 – 1912 (extension added)

Architect: Otto Wagner

Georg-Coch-Platz 2, Vienna

The listed Austrian Postal Savings Bank in Vienna, built in two sections over a trape­zoidal ground plan from 1904 to 1912, is Otto Wagner’s most important work in terms of the develo­pment of modern architecture.

The effect of the ratio­nally designed facade is largely deter­mined by the materials: Granite, marble and aluminum create a strict as well as simple rhythm of wall and openings.

The granite slabs of the facade’s base are fixed with countersunk pins with aluminum heads.

In contrast, the white marble panels of the upper floors, only 2 cm thick, are fixed with raised pins with aluminum heads.

The different way of fixing creates a subtle ornamen­tation, which is comple­mented by vertical platelets intended to suggest supports and bases of pilaster positions.

Fitting the facade with aluminum-clad iron bolts represents a technical necessity, a program­matic demons­tration of modernity.

At the same time, as an iron-clad treasure chest, the building represents the prototype of safekeeping of saved and invested money.

The central risalit of the Savings Bank is crowned by a parapet decorated with laurel wreaths.

The four-meter-high Nike figures at the upper corners of the main facade were designed by Othmar Schimkowitz and are made of cast aluminum.

The aluminum used by Otto Wagner as a new building material is also found in the striking canopy of the entrance.

The spacious vestibule leads to the central counter area in the glass-roofed courtyard.

The cashier’s hall with its thought­fully designed details such as the lighting fixtures or the warm air blowers of the heating system is an outstanding example of functio­n­alist archi­tecture of the early modern era.

Otto Wagner designed all details with the aim of achieving the greatest possible practi­cality and usability.

Floor coverings, wall panels, carpets, radiators, lamps, clocks, door buckles, standing desks, switches, stools, benches, armchairs, desks, closets, étagères and even safes are all subject to this principle.

The feet of the seating furniture in the Postal Savings Bank are covered with sleeves, the armrests with bands, which not only protects them from wear and tear, but also empha­sizes their uniqueness.

The utility value of the hot-air blowers in the central teller hall is aesthe­ti­cally exagge­rated; they become icons of design.

„Everything modernly created must illus­trate our own better, democratic, self-confident, our keenly thinking being“ Otto Wagner, 1913

In 2005, the Savings Bank building underwent a general renovation.

The work mainly comprised the following areas: Restoration of the histo­ri­cally parti­cu­larly signi­ficant public areas and the boardroom area, removal of the subse­quently erected window grilles in the base area of the building, return of interior rooms to the original building condition intended by Otto Wagner, recon­struction and repair of the offices, resto­ration of the large teller hall as well as the double-shell historic steel and glass roof structure above it, renovation of the facades of the interior tile courtyard as well as the erection of a new protective roof over the tile courtyard to protect the historic building fabric below.

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, first floor and mezzanine floor plans, 1904-1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

Postal Savings Bank, first floor and mezzanine floor plans, 1904–1912. Architect: Otto Wagner

2 Comments

  1. Thank you for making me aware of your website. I chased Otto Wagner’s work and the other Vienna Werkstatte buildings all over Vienna. The Post Office is absolutely stunning. 

    You have catalogued so many wonderful buildings in these four countries here. Very well done.

    I will enjoy exploring your website.

    • Thank you for the kind words! I am also very enthu­si­astic about the Viennese Modernist buildings. Every week I present a new building on my website and I am pleased if you enjoy it.

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