Munich: Medical Reading Hall / Kunsthaus Brakl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl
Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

1909 – 1910 and 1912 – 1913

Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Lessingstraße 2, Beethovenplatz 1, Munich

Starting in 1909, Franz Josef Brakl had a residential building built on Beethovenplatz in Munich according to plans by the architect Emanuel von Seidl, followed by a new exhibition building for his art gallery in 1912/13.

Brakl was one of the most important gallery owners of modern art in Germany at this time and exhibited painters of the Blaue Reiter as well as artists of the association Die Scholle.

Franz Josef Brakl was initially a lyric tenor at the Komische Oper in Vienna. There he was disco­vered by the director of the Munich Theater am Gärtnerplatz, Karl von Perfall, and immediately engaged.

On June 1, 1898, Franz Josef Brakl took over the direc­torship of the Gärtnerplatz Theater, but he relin­quished it just one year later.

In 1905 Brakl retired from active theater life. He founded the Kunsthaus Brakl, which quickly gained a strong reputation.

In February 1910 he showed the works of Franz Marc in a solo exhibition and intro­duced him to August Macke.

The new exhibition building, which was opened on May 26, 1913, is decorated in late Art Nouveau forms. Inside, the exhibition rooms are grouped around a skylight hall.

In his newly created rooms, Franz Josef Brakl changed the way the works of art on display were presented. Whereas he had previously shown them in simulated residential rooms, the halls of the newly built Kunsthaus now offered entirely new possi­bi­lities for presentation.

In the skylight hall, he had black wall coverings installed to demons­trate and enhance the distant effect of the artworks.

The building was acquired by the University of Munich at the end of the 1920s and rebuilt and moder­nized in 1928 according to plans by Theodor Fischer.

Today, the former gallery building houses the medical library and reading room of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich with a total of 165 reading and working places.

From 2011 to 2013, the listed building was renovated and expanded.

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909-1913. Architekt: Emanuel von Seidl

Brakls Kunsthaus, 1909–1913. Architect: Emanuel von Seidl

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *