Weimar: Grand-Ducal Saxon School of Art

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde
Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

1904 – 1911

Architect: Henry van de Velde

Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 8, Weimar

From 1904 to 1911, the Grand-Ducal Saxon School of Art was built in two construction phases according to plans by Henry van de Velde. Originally, a half-timbered building stood on this site, which housed the rooms of the art school and was generally known as the Art Barn. In 1904, an extension was added to the east. From 1905 to 1906, a new building for the Grand-Ducal Saxon School of Arts and Crafts, directed by van de Velde, followed opposite the school. It was not until 1911 that a further extension of the school of arts was approved. Instead of the half-timbered building, the central and western part with its charac­te­ristic studio windows was built.

The school in Weimar is one of the most important art school buildings of the turn of the century and was the founding site of the Bauhaus in 1919. Today, the building is used by the Faculty of Architecture and Urban Planning of the Bauhaus University Weimar and the office of the University President. Inside the building, the skylight rooms, the ellip­tical central staircase and the statue of Eve by Auguste Rodin are parti­cu­larly noteworthy.

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904-1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Art School, 1904–1911. Architect: Henry van de Velde

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