Weimar: Haus Hohe Pappeln

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde
Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

1906 – 1907

Architect: Henry van de Velde

Belvederer Allee 58, Weimar

The house Hohe Pappeln is the former residence of Henry van de Velde and his family.

In 1902, the Belgian architect and designer came to Weimar. On behalf of the Grand Duke he was to advise the Thuringian craftsmen on design matters.

He founded the Arts and Crafts Seminar, from which the Weimar School of Arts and Crafts was founded in 1908.

Van de Velde planned the outer shape of his house out of the inner structure and function of the rooms.

Wall color, fixtures, furniture, fabrics and ceramics – everything had been designed by van de Velde himself and harmo­niously coordi­nated. He was guided by the aesthetics of modern industry and designed according to principles of practicality.

The garden was also part of the overall concept. Each facade was assigned a different area: To the street was an ornamental garden with fruit trees, to the south side an open space with a fountain, and in front of the utility rooms of the house a kitchen garden with a greenhouse.

In the garden there is a fountain with the figure of a kneeling youth by Georg Minne.

Van de Velde lived in the Hohe Pappeln house with his wife and five children until 1917.

Through an anteroom with a staircase leading to the private rooms on the upper floor, one entered the salon, which served as a social room, music room and boudoir.

From the drawing room, sliding doors lead to the master’s study and the dining room, from which a staircase led directly into the garden.

The kitchen was located in the basement.

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906-1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

Haus Hohe Pappen, 1906–1907. Architect: Henry van de Velde

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