Stuttgart: Weissenhof Estate Terrace House Peter Behrens

Wohnanlage, 1927. Architekt: Peter Behrens
Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

1927

Architect: Peter Behrens

Am Weissenhof 30–32, Hölzelweg 3–5, Stuttgart

The Weissenhof Estate was built in 1927 as part of the building exhibition „Die Wohnung“, organized by the Deutscher Werkbund and financed by the city of Stuttgart.

During the exhibition, the 33 realized houses could be viewed from the outside and inside. Afterwards, they were rented out by the city.

Seventeen inter­na­tional archi­tects under the artistic direction of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, presented their innovative designs for modern, healthy, affordable and functional living.

In addition to the model houses in the Weissenhof Estate, there were three other exhibi­tions on modern building worldwide, interior design and new building materials and constructions.

Within just four months, 500,000 visitors came to see the exhibition, which had a worldwide resonance.

The Weissenhof Estate showed the then current develo­pment of archi­tecture and housing.

A formal coherence was achieved through the avant-garde archi­tec­tural views of the contri­buting archi­tects and the speci­fi­cation of flat roofs.

The up to four-storey residential complex by Peter Behrens consists of four houses with twelve apart­ments of 54 or 60 square metres each.

The overall structure is stepped in such a way that the flat roof of the lower house forms the terrace of the higher house above.

This type of terrace house was intended to provide access to light and sun and was for Behrens the prototype of the urban residential building.

In 1927, he wrote about his project in the publi­cation „Bau und Wohnung“ (Construction and Housing), which appeared on the occasion of the Werkbund exhibition:

The greatest building misery exists in the mass rental houses of the large cities to date. …

The „terrace house“ I have designed is a conglo­merate of one-story, two-story, three-story and four-story houses, which are inserted into each other in such a way that the flat roof of the lower house always forms the terrace for the higher house behind it.

All the first floor apart­ments have their open spaces in a front garden separated by a wall from the nearest one.

The first floor is given balconies 2 meters deep, projecting on concrete slabs, while the second floor is given terraces the size of the rooms below by the front wall receding by the depth of the rooms below.

On the third floor, a part of the rooms of the second floor remain as terraces.

Above the third floor of the central wing, a large roof garden of about 144 square meters stretches out, providing a substitute for benefits hoped for from urban open spaces by planting and creating play areas in the inner city.

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

Terrace House, 1927. Architect: Peter Behrens

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