Munich: Main Customs Office

Hauptzollamt, 1912. Architekt: Hugo Kaiser
Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

1912

Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Landsberger Strasse 122–132, Munich

The former Munich Main Customs Office is a building complex dating from 1912 at Landsberger Straße 122–132 in the Schwanthalerhöhe district of Munich.

The building was designed by the royal government and building assessor Hugo Kaiser.

The extensive building complex housed the main customs office of the city of Munich until 2004.

The buildings were constructed in a combi­nation of late Art Nouveau and reform archi­tecture.

Bavaria had already had a modern financial adminis­tration with a general customs and toll direc­torate since 1807. In 1874, Munich’s main customs office was moved to a building designed by Friedrich Bürklein on Bayerstrasse near Munich’s main train station.

Due to an upswing in long-distance trade and a new customs law of 1906, the main customs office no longer met the demand. An expansion on the property was not possible. Therefore, the government commis­sioned a new building for the main customs office in Munich in 1908.

The design and model by Hugo Kaiser were approved by Prince Regent Luitpold in 1908. The buildings were erected from 1909 to 1912 and inaugu­rated by his son Prince Ludwig on July 1, 1912.

The warehouse and adminis­tration building were of reinforced concrete skeleton construction and were among the first reinforced concrete buildings of this size in Europe.

The reinforced concrete struc­tures were built by the Munich construction companies Gebr. Rank and Heilmann & Littmann, the wrought iron work came from F. F. Kustermann.

The heating system came from Eisenwerke Kaiserslautern. Cranes were supplied by Wilhelm Spaeth Maschinenfabrik in Nuremberg and Georg Noell & Co. in Würzburg. The pneumatic tube system was built by Alois Zettler, and other technical instal­la­tions came from Siemens-Schuckertwerke.

The appro­xi­mately 35,000 m² site was covered with 14,000 m² of floor space.

The entire complex comprises the adminis­trative building, the 180 m long warehouse building adjoining at right angles to the north and running to the west, the customs technical testing and training institute set off to the east, and three blocks of flats for employees to the south on Landsberger Strasse.

The adminis­trative building, the actual customs office, is oriented in a north-south direction and has a show facade with a convex gable and clock tower.

The front of the building is formed by a trans­verse office wing, behind which is the central counter hall. It is 35 m long, 14.5 m wide and reaches 14 m high over three floors.

The counter hall is charac­te­rized by a barrel vault with massive frame trusses made of reinforced concrete. The ceiling surfaces are decorated with coffered stucco.

Behind the adminis­trative building, across the railroad tracks, is the warehouse wing. It has four main floors and, including the roof and cellars, a total of nine floors with a combined storage area of about 30,000 m².

The first floor was used for customs clearance, the upper floors were used as bonded warehouses.

In the eastern third, the dome of the 45 m high light shaft inter­rupts the massive gable roof. It overhangs the ridge of the warehouse by 18 m.

The four-story residential blocks on Landsberger Strasse contained 47 apart­ments for customs office employees.

They were graded according to rank between seven rooms for the head of the office, four- to five-room apart­ments for customs inspectors and three-room apart­ments for other officials, super­visors and machinists.

All apart­ments had kitchens with gas stoves and central heating. The more upscale apart­ments had private bathrooms and electricity. The courtyard between the residential buildings was lands­caped and equipped with a children’s playground.

The sculpture work on the facades and inside the adminis­tration building was done by Georg Albertshofer and Julius Seidler.

In the vestibule and counter hall, there are wrought decorative grilles, carved stair railing supports, and counter fronts of polished shell limestone.

Other areas were adorned with stenciled wall decora­tions, with palmette friezes, beadwork, and coffers dividing the walls.

The main customs office has been a listed building since 1976.

The building of the customs testing and training institute underwent general renovation from 2011 to 2014 after the testing institute’s labora­tories moved to a new building near Munich Airport.

Customs offices and the Federal Real Estate Agency moved into the vacant offices. The attached residential buildings are rented out by the Bundesanstalt für Immobilienaufgaben, preferably to federal civil servants.

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

Main Customs Office, 1912. Architect: Hugo Kaiser

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