Purkersdorf: Sanatorium

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architekt: Josef Hoffmann
Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

1904 – 1905

Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Wiener Strasse 60–70, Purkersdorf

The Purkersdorf Sanatorium was built between 1904 and 1905 by Josef Hoffmann for the general director of the Silesian Ironworks in Gliwice, Victor Zuckerkandl.

It is consi­dered an outstanding example of archi­tecture in the style of the Viennese Secession.

In 1903, Zuckerkandl acquired the property on the city limits of Vienna as a hydro­the­ra­peutic facility, including a park, in order to expand it.

The sanatorium soon became more of a hotel than a hospital and developed into a social and artistic gathering place for Viennese society.

Among the guests were: Arthur Schnitzler, Egon Friedell, Gustav Mahler, Arnold Schönberg, Hugo von Hofmannsthal and Koloman Moser.

Treatment methods included bathing cures, physical therapies, curative massage and remedial gymnastics. Various reading rooms, game rooms for card games, table tennis, billiards and music rooms provided enter­tainment for the guests.

In 1926, due to the increased need for space, an addition was made by architect Leopold Bauer against Josef Hoffmann’s wishes, which signi­fi­cantly affected the original design.

The sanatorium is consi­dered one of the main works of the cubic-geometric phase of Viennese Art Nouveau.

All edges of the three-story building, which appears cubic due to the flat roof and the symmetrical projec­tions and recesses of the long sides, are graphi­cally contoured with borders of blue and white ceramic tiles.

After the death of Victor Zuckerkandl in 1927, the sanatorium was taken over by his nephews and nieces. From 1930, a son-in-law continued to run the business with little success.

Towards the end of the Second World War, the building was used as a military hospital. In 1945 it was requi­si­tioned by the Red Army.

The exterior of the building was renovated in 1995, when the top floor was removed and the original appearance was restored. An interior renovation took place in 2003.

The sanatorium has had numerous additions over the years. Today it is used as a senior care residence.

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904-1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

Sanatorium, 1904–1905. Architect: Josef Hoffmann

 

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