Vienna: Substation Favoriten

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage
Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

1929 – 1931

Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Humboldtgasse 1–5, Wien

The Favoriten substation was built between 1929 and 1931 according to plans by archi­tects Eugen Kastner and Fritz Waage.

The building, which was erected on a trian­gular site that was rather unfavorable for the purpose, is charac­te­rized by a purely functional design, namely the accom­mo­dation of large trans­formers.

A circum­fe­rential one-story plinth zone forms the base, above which five stories rise. Square and round windows divide the smooth plaster facade, which is termi­nated at the top by an attic storey.

Like the prow of a steamship, the base structure thrusts itself into the street inter­section, and the stair tower rises above it like a command bridge.

The monumental effect of the building is explained by the sequence of massive rectan­gular and round structures.

The station manager’s office was constructed as a command bridge projecting above the structure, as was common on ocean liners. The circular windows are also reminiscent of ship designs.

In the 1920s, the area around the property in Favoriten was a barracks village. It was demolished in order to erect the imposing substation.

The design of the functional building, which is unusual for Vienna, possibly goes back to Soviet designs.

The Favoriten substation is one of the oldest substa­tions of Wiener Netze GmbH, which is still in operation after the renewal of the technical equipment.

Its purpose is to bring the applied current to a lower voltage. The electricity is then fed into the distri­bution networks, from where it reaches house­holds, for example.

Until the turn of the millennium, there was also a control station here from which the entire southern power grid, up to just before Wiener Neustadt, was controlled.

Thanks to remote control, the Viennese substa­tions hardly need any personnel, which is why the substation is mostly deserted today and is also used as a movie location for shooting.

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929-1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

Substation Favoriten, 1929–1931. Architects: Eugen Kastner, Fritz Waage

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