Munich: Extension Ludwig Maximilian University

Erweiterungsbau der LMU, 1906-1910. Architekt: German Bestelmeyer
Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

1906 – 1910

Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, Amalienstraße 54–58, Munich

In 1826, King Ludwig I of Bavaria decided on a new building for the Ludwig Maximilian University, which was to be erected at the northern end of Ludwigstrasse, which was only half completed at the time.

Friedrich von Gärtner was commis­sioned in 1827 to submit a design for the new building of the University of Munich.

In 1835, construction of the building, which was designed for a capacity of about 1,500 students, began.

As early as 1873, exten­sions proved to be unavo­idable due to the constantly growing number of students.

In addition to a whole series of other buildings, Emanuel Seidel’s extension, which was built between 1897 and 1898 as a western conti­nuation of the university’s north wing along Adalbertstraße, is parti­cu­larly worthy of mention.

From 1886 onwards, the university also attempted to overcome the ever-incre­asing problem of the lack of space through the targeted purchase of land.

In order to be able to develop a conti­guous area for a new university building, properties on Amalienstrasse and Adalbertstrasse in the immediate western vicinity of the original Gärtner Building came into question.

In 1902, the university had already succeeded in acquiring ten plots of land in this area.

In 1907, it succeeded in purchasing the last missing plots of land, so that the planned new building could begin.

Between 1906 and 1910, the university building was extended westwards towards Amalienstraße according to the plans of the young architect German Bestelmeyer.

Bestelmeyer was an assessor at the University Construction Office in Munich at the time.

Before he received the commission to extend the university, Bestelmeyer had already parti­ci­pated in various archi­tec­tural and monument competitions.

This had led to contacts with visual artists and craftsmen who were now involved in the artistic decoration of the extension building. Among them were the painter Wilhelm Köppen (mosaic floor in the atrium) and the sculptor Bernhard Bleeker (portrait sculp­tures on the staircase of the atrium).

The artists Josef Flossmann, Georg Albertshofer, Hermann Hahn and Ulfert Janssen were also among the parti­ci­pating artists.

Together with the painter Wilhelm Köppen and the sculptor Ulfert Janssen, Bestelmeyer undertook a study trip to Florence, the occasion of which was the artistic decoration of the assembly hall.

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906-1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

Extension Ludwig Maximilian University, 1906–1910. Architect: German Bestelmeyer

 

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