Kaiserslautern: Maria Schutz Catholic Minorite Church

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929 Architekt: Hans Seeberger
Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

1928 – 1929

Architect: Hans Seeberger

Bismarckstraße 63, Kaiserslautern

The Gelöbniskirche Maria Schutz is a Roman Catholic parish and pilgrimage church and a Minorite monastery church in Kaiserslautern.

It was built from 1928 to 1929 according to plans by archi­tects Hans and Fritz Seeberger.

The reason for the construction was a vow made by Bishop Michael Faulhaber of Speyer at the outbreak of the First World War on August 2, 1914.

He promised to build a church in honor of Maria Schutz if the Palatinate was spared severe destruction.

Faulhaber’s successor Ludwig Sebastian fulfilled the promise with the help of numerous donations from the diocese.

The church was conse­crated on October 20, 1929, and the Minorites took over its care.

Prior to that, in 1926/27, the convent buildings of the Minorites had first been built on the land acquired by the Kirchenbauverein Sankt Antonius for the church and convent.

The foundation stone for the church was laid on June 10, 1928. The conse­cration took place one year later.

The church is a three-nave basilica with double-tower facade in brick and sandstone.

Narrow slit-like blind arches divide the tower facades. Original pointed spires were destroyed during World War II and replaced with flat pyramidal roofs.

The sculp­tures of St. Michael the Archangel, St. Mary and St. Louis above the portal were created by sculptor Simon Höpfel.

Inside, the nave has a flat roof, and the present coffered ceiling was added after the war.

Narrow lancet windows with pointed arches light the central nave.

The apse, with its expressive pointed arches rising from the floor, frames the image of a Virgin of Mercy. Beneath Mary’s mantle, Bishops Michael von Faulhaber and Ludwig Sebastian can be seen on the right and left.

During the Second World War in 1944, the church was severely damaged and recon­structed in 1947/48.

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928-1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

Maria Schutz, 1928–1929. Architects: Hans and Fritz Seeberger

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