Berlin: Schell-Haus

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architekt: Emil Fahrenkamp
Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

The Schell-Haus with the destructions of the Second World War between 1939 and 1945

The Schell-Haus with the destruc­tions of the Second World War between 1939 and 1945

1930 – 1932

Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Reichpietschufer 60, Berlin

The listed Schell-Haus was built from 1930 to 1932 as the headquarters of the Schell subsi­diary Rhenania Ossag Mineralölwerke on the Landwehrkanal near Potsdamer Platz in Berlin according to the plans by architect Emil Fahrenkamp.

The steel skeleton building, articu­lated by travertine cladding and asymmetri­cally divided windows with steel framing, has a facade on the Landwehr Canal that is offset by one window axis each and has rounded corners, with the building height rising from six to ten stories.

The facade resembles a wave movement due to the rounding of the windows and building corners as well as the connection of the individual building elements.

Remarkable is the novel construction, designed by civil engineer Gerhard Mensch, to ensure high stability and a vibration-free stand.

The shell house, which encloses an interior courtyard, is founded on a reinforced concrete trough extending to about 9 m below street level.

To absorb vibra­tions, the side walls of the tub are separated from the struc­tural elements above by a 2 cm wide air slot, thus absorbing the vibra­tions generated by road traffic in the building.

The commercial building is accessed by three large stair­cases with elevators.

It has a two-story basement, with an under­ground garage in the first basement level. The upper floors contain variable-sized, predo­mi­nantly single- and double-axis office space.

On the second floor there is a meeting room, and on the tenth floor there are the casino and kitchen rooms.

The flat roofs are acces­sible as terraces.

Heavily damaged during the war, especially on the upper floors, it was exten­sively renovated at the end of the 1990s.

The Schell-Haus is consi­dered one of the most important examples of modern archi­tecture of office buildings in the Weimar Republic.

Since 2012, it has been part of the second official headquarters of the German Federal Ministry of Defense, alongside the Bendlerblock.

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930-1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

Schell-Haus, 1930–1932. Architect: Emil Fahrenkamp

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *